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Good vs. bad writingOne of these abstracts has been thoroughly edited by an expert Academic Editor See for yourself - Go ahead and decide which one of these two abstracts is better!

Original abstract*:


WRTR gene is widely found in many organisms, which is closely related to the growth and development of animals, especially sex determination and differentiation. Epathelus amamensis is considered to be a good model to study gonad differentiation and sex determination due to its protogynous hermaphrodite sex development characteristic. However, the sex-determination related genes and its molecular mechanism in E. amamensis remained unclear. Here, we cloned the full-length cDNAs of WRTR (EaWRTR2, EaWRTR2b, EaWRTR3) gene from amamensis. The complete cDNAs of the EaWRTR2, EaWRTR2b, EaWRTR3 were predicted to encode 466, 448 and 473 amino acids, respectively. Tissue distribution show WRTR genes is mainly expressed in gonad, high expression of EaWRTR in the testis and EaWRTR2 in the ovary. In addition, we used MT (17 α-methyltestosterone) to induced sex reversal of E. amamensis. The MT can be induced by a female into a male E. amamensis. Experiments were found that sex determination and differentiation of E. amamensis were hormone sensitive dependence. The expression level of EaWRTR2 was significantly increased (P<0. 05) after feeding MT, and significantly decreased (P<0. 05) after stopping feeding MT. In contrast, the expression level of EaWRTR2b was significantly decreased (P<0. 05) after feeding MT, and significantly increased (P<0. 05) after stopping feeding MT. The expression of EaWRTR3 genes is not affected by exogenous hormones. However, the expression of EaWRTR2 gene in ovary stage II and intersex gonad was higher than in testis. Ours study suggests that EaWRTR2 was involved in E. amamensis male sex determination, while EaWRTR2bmay have a significant impact on E. amamensis premature ovarian differentiation and function maintenance.


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Edited Abstract:


Genes of the WRTR family are found in many organisms. In animals, the expression of these genes is closely related to growth and development, and especially to sex determination. Epinephelus amamensis is a good model to study sex determination, because it has protogynous hermaphroditic sex development (a type of development that allows sex reversal). In E. amamensis the genes related to sex determination have not been fully characterized. We have cloned the full-length cDNAs of three E. amamensis WRTR genes (EaWRTR2, EaWRTR2b, EaWRTR3). The complete cDNAs of EaWRTR2, EaWRTR2b, and EaWRTR3 predict proteins of 466, 448, and 473 amino acids, respectively, which is consistent with the size of these family of proteins in other species. E. amamensis WRTR genes were mainly expressed in the gonads. EcaWRTR2 was mainly expressed in the testes and EaWRTR2b in the ovaries. We used 17 α-methyltestosterone supplied in the diet to induce E. amamensis to undergo female-to-male sex reversal. EcWRTR2 expression was significantly increased by dietary 17α-methyltestosterone. In contrast, the expression of EcWRTR2b was significantly decreased by this compound. Altered expression of EcWRTR2 and EcWRTR2b was normalized after 17 α-methyltestosterone was removed from the diet, stopping the process of sex reversal. Our study suggests that EaWRTR2 and EaWRTR2b have a prominent role in sex determination in E. amamensis.


Now, ask yourself the same questions:


Did you identify the scientific question that drove the research?

Do you think that the methodology used is consistent with the research question?

Can you see the relationship between the results described and the research question?

Do you think that the author’s conclusion is correct


Is everything crystal-clear now?


*The names of the genes, the name of the organism, and other details have been altered from the original text to protect the author’s privacy.

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